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<jats:p>Objective to review of the evidence from studies comparing SARS-CoV-2 culture, the best indicator of current infection and infectiousness with the results of reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Methods We searched LitCovid, medRxiv, Google Scholar and Google for Covid-19 for viral culture or viral replication and associated synonyms up to 31st August 2020. We carried out citation matching and included studies reporting attempts to culture or observe SARS-CoV-2 matching the with cutoffs for RT-PCR positivity. One reviewer extracted data for each study and a second reviewer checked end edited the extraction and summarised the narratively by sample: fecal, respiratory, environment or mixed. Where necessary we wrote to corresponding authors of the included or background papers for additional information. We assessed quality using a modified QUADAS 2 risk of bias tool. This review is part of an Open Evidence Review on Transmission Dynamics of COVID-19. Summaries of the included studies and the protocol (v1) are available at: https://www.cebm.net/evidence-synthesis/transmission-dynamics-of-covid-19/. Searches are updated every 2 weeks. This is the third version of this review that was fist published on the 4th of August and updated on the 21St of August. https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.08.04.20167932v2 Results We included 25 studies reporting culturing or observing tissue invasion by SARS-CoV in sputum, naso or oropharyngeal, urine, stool, blood and environmental samples from patients diagnosed with Covid-19. The data are suggestive of a relation between the time from collection of a specimen to test, cycle threshold (as a proxy for viral load) and symptom severity. The quality of the studies was moderate with lack of standardised reporting. Ten studies reported that Ct values were significantly lower and log copies higher in those with live virus culture. Nine studies reported no growth in samples based on a Ct cut-off value. These values ranged from CT &gt; 24 for no growth to Ct greater or equal to 34. Two studies report a strong relationship between Ct value and ability to recover infectious virus and that the odds of live virus culture reduced by 33% for every one unit increase in Ct. A cut-off RT-PCR Ct &gt; 30 was associated with non-infectious samples. One study that analysed the NSP, N and E gene fragments of the PCR result reported different cut-off thresholds depending on the gene fragment analysed. The duration of RNA shedding detected by PCR was far longer compared to detection of live culture. Six out of eight studies reported RNA shedding for longer than 14 days. Yet, Infectivity declines after day 8 even among cases with ongoing high viral loads. A very small proportion of people re-testing positive after hospital discharge or with high Ct are likely to be infectious. Conclusion Prospective routine testing of reference and culture specimens are necessary for each country involved in the pandemic to establish the usefulness and reliability of PCR for Covid-19 and its relation to patients factors. Infectivity is related to the date of onset of symptoms and cycle threshold level. A binary Yes/No approach to the interpretation RT-PCR unvalidated against viral culture will result in false positives with segregation of large numbers of people who are no longer infectious and hence not a threat to public health.</jats:p>

Original publication

DOI

10.1101/2020.08.04.20167932

Type

Journal article

Publisher

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Publication Date

04/08/2020